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Anxiety Disorder

Article

Antipsychotics and Anticonvulsants for Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety Disorders - The Carlat Psychiatry Report (TCPR)

We know how frequently our patients complain of anxiety. Anxiety disorders are common, chronic conditions. They also increase the risk for mood and substance disorders, and complaints of anxiety are found in a wide range of other psychiatric and medical conditions, as well.

Understanding and Treating Panic Disorder

The Carlat Behavioral Health (TCRBH), November 2012, Panic Disorder

As it is currently conceptualized in the DSM-IV-TR, panic disorder can occur with or without agoraphobia. This article will describe what is involved in determining whether an individual has panic disorder and how to treat it.

Research Update

Should We Prescribe Meditation to Our Patients?

Many people claim that meditation helps them reduce stress, anxiety, or depression, but little quality evidence exists to support those anecdotes. Add to that the difficulty in designing a controlled trial of meditation—eg, how can people be blinded to their treatment group?—and it’s hard to know how to counsel patients on the effectiveness of this strategy.

Can Instant Messaging Enhance Treatment Outcomes?

Whether you see your patients quarterly, monthly, or even weekly, you certainly are not with them as much as their cell phones are.

Expert QA

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

Some of the CBT techniques that have proven effective for panic disorder include breathing retraining, cognitive restructuring, and relaxation training.

Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy for OCD

Exposure and response prevention (ERP) is an extremely effective therapy. You can say with conviction that if a patient commits to this therapy, it really has a good chance of reducing suffering.

Free Article

Seven Clinical Pearls for Suicide Risk Assessment [Free Article]

Source: 
Risk Management
Risk Management - The Carlat Psychiatry Report - June 2012

Assessing a patient’s risk of suicide is one of the most common, yet challenging, exercises for the psychiatrist.

Benzodiazepines: A Guide to Safe Prescribing

Source: 
Anxiety Disorders
The Carlat Report - Anxiety Disorders

Most of us who prescribe benzodiazepines (BZs) have a love-hate relationship with them. On the one hand, they work quickly and effectively for anxiety and agitation, but on the other hand, we worry about sedative side effects and the fact that they can be difficult to taper because of withdrawal symptoms.