Dual Diagnosis in Addiction Medicine (May/June)

Date of Issue: 05/01/2019 | Volume: 7 | Number: 3&4

Issue Links:Learning Objectives | Editorial Information

Just about any psychiatric disorder has a higher rate of addiction comorbidity than in the general population. More than 50% of people in addiction treatment settings will have a co-occurring psychiatric problem. This issue covers dual diagnosis with two Expert Q&As on the topic.

In This Issue

Article

Managing Substance-Related Agitation

Topics: Agitation | Substance Use Disorder | Withdrawal

In emergency departments, psychiatrists are often consulted on patients presenting with agitation. In many cases, these patients are under the influence of substances—either from intoxication or withdrawal.

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Expert Q&A

Treating Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders

Topics: Co-occurring disorders | Diagnosis | Substance Use Disorder

Just about any psychiatric disorder has a higher rate of addiction comorbidity than in the general population. The rates are even higher in treatment settings—more than 50% of people in addiction treatment settings will have a co-occurring psychiatric problem, and more than 50% in psychiatric settings will typically have a co-occurring Substance Use Disorder.

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Article

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Substance Use Disorders

Topics: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy | Substance Use Disorder

Here’s the basic framework of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), how it can be applied to Substance Use Disorders, and ways to incorporate parts of CBT into your daily addiction treatment practice.

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Expert Q&A

Co-Occurring Addiction and PTSD

Topics: Addiction Treatment | Co-occurring disorders | PTSD | Substance Use Disorder | Trauma

Individuals who have PTSD have a high risk of developing other disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs). Studies have shown that both in the veteran and non-veteran populations, these numbers are high.

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Research Update

Oral vs Extended-Release Naltrexone for Opioid Use Disorder

Topics: Addiction Treatment | Naltrexone | Opioid Use Disorder | Research Update

Extended-release (XR) naltrexone (Vivitrol) is FDA approved for opioid use disorder and has shown efficacy in several trials. It works best for patients who have already successfully detoxed from opioids and who are highly motivated to abstain. But what about oral naltrexone?

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Research Update

Does Extended-Release Naltrexone Worsen Psychiatric Symptoms?

Topics: Naltrexone | Opioids | Research Update

Extended-release (XR) naltrexone (Vivitrol) is an injectable version of naltrexone that lasts for 4 weeks and is FDA approved for opioid use disorder (OUD). Although effective, there is some concern that XR naltrexone may cause or worsen psychiatric symptoms because of its opioid blockade.

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CME Post-Test

CME Post-Test - Dual Diagnosis in Addiction Medicine, CATR, May/June 2019

Topics: CME Post-Test

The post-test for this issue is available for one year after the publication date to subscribers only. By successfully completing the test you will be awarded a certificate for 2 CME credits.

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