Retirement (November)

Date of Issue: 11/01/2017 | Volume: 15 | Number: 1

Issue Links:Learning Objectives | Editorial Information

Whether it's due to immediate health concerns, or deciding to retire after years of working as a psychiatrist, we'll all eventually decide to close our practices. This issue takes you through what you need to know to prepare for that day, and includes helpful tips, sample forms, and other tools designed for closing a practice in both planned unplanned situations.

In This Issue

Article

Note From the Editor-in-Chief

Topics: Practice Tools and Tips

While I appreciate all of my TCPR subscribers, there’s one subscriber whom I value above all the others: my father. A psychiatrist who practices in the Bay Area, my father has been a loyal subscriber since Volume 1, Number 1, in January of 2003.

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Article

Closing a Practice: Some Practical Suggestions

Topics: Free Articles | Practice Tools and Tips

This article offers practical suggestions based on the author’s experiences counseling psychiatrists who are planning for retirement or who have faced unforeseen circumstances causing them to close their practices. Here, we will consider both planned and unplanned retirement scenarios.

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Expert Q&A

Financial Planning for Retirement

Topics: Practice Tools and Tips

Because of the lengthy period of training, doctors begin their first “real” jobs 8–10 years after many of their friends from college. And, depending on specialty, burnout may cause a physician to retire a few years earlier than the average American. Both these factors lead to a compressed retirement saving timeline.

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Research Update

Aripiprazole Augmentation May Improve Remission Rates in MDD

Topics: Antidepressants | Research Updates

It seems like an endless debate: When a patient does not respond to the first trial of an antidepressant, what should we do? Switch to something else? Augment with another agent? If the latter, how often should that augmenting agent be an atypical antipsychotic?

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Research Update

Fluoxetine Plus CBT for Somatic Symptom Disorder

Topics: Research Updates

Somatic symptom disorder (formerly known as hypochondriasis) is pretty common, with a prevalence of 5%–7%, and is much more likely to afflict women than men, with a gender ratio of about 10:1. While both psychotherapy and SSRI treatment are helpful, there is limited evidence about the efficacy of combining therapy with medication. A new study sought to remedy this gap.

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CME Post-Test

CME Post-Test - Retirement, TCPR, November 2017

Topics: CME Post-Test

The post-test for this issue is available for one year after the publication date to subscribers only. By successfully completing the test you will be awarded a certificate for 1 CME credit.

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